Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Egyptians turn towards the Monarchy to show their opposition of the oppressive republic

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Egyptians turn towards the Monarchy to show their opposition of the oppressive republic


    Criticising Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi is a dangerous venture in the Nile country. "His method of governance is one that sucks the life out of the democratic and pluralistic aspirations that millions of Egyptians embraced after President Hosni Mubarakís resignation in 2011. ... Sisi has returned the country to a state comparable to the strongman days of President Gamal Abdel Nasser. Nasser set the precedent for military rule and severe controls on the flow of information and knowledge, arguably the two greatest constraints on human and national development in the Arab world since 1952." (Aljazeera America).

     It seems safer to refer to the pre-1952 period as the "the beautiful era". The years of King Farouk I mean glamour, class, religious tolerance and a civilised society. That's the quintessence of an article on the BBC Trending website: Why are some Egyptians pinning away for their long-gone king?

    "I'm begging King Farouk not to leave Egypt to the army," an Egyptian tweeted recently - quite an odd plea, as Egypt hasn't had a monarch for more than 60 years. But that message, and thousands like it, were shared in a sort of mass historical role play that pushed the phrase "Tweet as if you're in the 1950s" to the top of Egypt's Twitter charts.

     A Facebook fan page in his name that was set up in August 2011 has been liked more than 2.2 million times. "King Farouk was wrongly and unfairly depicted," says Amr Abu Seif, a 40-year-old Egyptian who set up the Facebook page as well as a King Farouk website, which he started in 2007 after he couldn't find any websites dedicated to the Egyptian monarchy.

    Queen Narriman and King Farouk I with his son Fouad II on his lap.
    Of course, there is an Egyptian king: Fouad II, son and heir of King Farouk who became king in 1952, after his father was forced to go into exile. However, the baby-king was deposed by Nasser in 1953. However, he keeps in touch with the Egyptian people and send a royal message on the occassion of Eid, the end of Ramadan. (For a rough translation you can use https://translate.google.com/)

    ??????????????? ?????????? ??????????????? ??????? ????? ??? ????????? ????????????? ????????????
    ????? ???? ?????? -??? ??? ??????- ?????? ????? ??????? ????? ??????? ??????? ??????? ??????????? ??????? ???? ???
    ????? ???????? ???? ??????? ?????? ?????? ??? ?? ???? ????? ????? ???? ??????? ??????? ???? ????? ????????? ????? ??? ????? ???? ??
    ????? ??????? ?? ?????? ??????.
    ????? ???? ?????? ?????? ?? ??? ???? ????? ???? ?????? ?? ????? ???? ?????? ???????? ??? ??????? ??????? ??????? ??? ????
    ??? ?????? ????? ????? ??? ?? ?? ??? ????? ?????? ??? ?????? ???? ??????. ??? ??? ???????? ???????? ?????? ????? ???
    ???? ???????? ?? ???? ???? ????? ??????? ?????????? ?? ????? ??????? ???? ??????? ????? ??????? ?? ?? ????? ??? ?????
    ??????? ??????? ??? ?????? ???????? ???????? ???????? ?????????? ???????? ???????? ??? ????? ???????? ?????????.
    ??? ???? ??? ??????

    ?????? ????????


    More...

    vbulletin coder
Working...
X