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BLAININC

Visual Discrimination.

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August 4th 2015

Visual Discrimination. Images stamp time.
Who and what are we seeing through our experienced and conditioned eyes?
When art is created with the specific purpose of capturing an image … an ever changing landscape reveals itself. Once an image is captured it is transformed into a static image.
The World turns revealing its ever changing landscape.
Does the camera discriminate between black and white, colour and shape? Yes and no. It does through the eyes of the image maker and viewer and it doesn’t because the camera is an inanimate object.
The artist does creatively discriminate when taking an image. It is part of the objective.
Time has established that an image can change cultural conditioning. Change does happen and photographers adapt to the changing landscape by taking an opportune moment to expose a photograph. The next photo captured is unrelated to the previous photo as the new moment has no relation to any previous moment.
This becomes our new conditioned moment. Images stamp time.
What impact does an image have on the greater population and how has history responded when noting specific changes? History is marked through the creation of image making. What images have there been in history that form the basis for change? Architecture, political, poetry, religious icons, paintings, photos, formal art and installations, newspapers and death.
Photography is a personal journey - time stamping (blogging) imagery.
Artists have often presented themselves with this viewpoint. Commissioned projects are predominantly represented through the artists’ eyes. Art can be created by a child, a hobbyist or a professional. An innocent and in many times therapeutic endeavour for the artist and the viewer.
Many thanks.
Pic: Tourism tunnel. Bund to Pudong. Shanghai. China. Blaininc. Blain Crellin Photography




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